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220. THE WEXFORD MERMAID Act 2

Act 1 of this silly play can be found in entry 216. I LOVE IT HERE

THE WEXFORD MERMAID, a play by Frankie Perussault

Act 2

Setting: The inside of a pub with small stained glass windows, entry on the right, a bar on the left with a couple of tall stools, empty and full glasses of guinness on various tables, small groups of extras mumbling as background sound, some background music.

At a table in the front of the stage: The Young man, the Businessman, the Musician

- Musician: This is a brilliant idea but how will your bridge hold on such a distance?

- Businessman: suspended, of course, latest technology.

- Musician: What? From a satellite?

- Businessman (laughing): No! Engineers jargon. You can't understand.

Musician plays a bit of a music phrase on his violin or flute.

- Young man: From Wexford to St Malo it will have to go over Lands End in Cornwall.

His sister the schoolgirl storms in from entry door on the right.

- Schoolgirl (mad): I've been looking for you all over the place. I've even asked your girlfriend if she knew where you were (gets cut off)

- Musician and Businessman (together): The mermaid?!

- Schoolgirl (shruggs her shoulders): Dad wants you to help him with the trailer. He's putting the boat out, he wants to go fishing to-morrow.

- Young man (standing up promptly): I'm coming, I'm coming!

Schoolgirl and Young man leave in a hurry by the entry door to the right.

- Musician: Over Lands End to St Malo? It sounds funny. Let's have a look.

- Businessman (while unfolding a large map): Quite handy actually, we will have an arch on land there between two suspended parts.

While, mumbling, they scrutinise the map, a troll comes in at the back pushing through a stainglass window. One of the pub patron helps him out and places him on a tall stool. The troll is served some drink and people slap him on the back jokingly. He leaves the way he came.

- Musician: Instead of suspended, why not have it floating? You know, like they do in the army to cross rivers.

- Businessman (beaming): Brillian, brilliant! I had not thought of that!

Musician plays a bit of a music phrase.

- Musician: Yes, but it won't work... (gets cut off)

Enters the Tall lady with long shiny dress shuffling her feet to the bar. Dead silence in the pub until she leaves with a beer can.

- Musician: It won't work, the shipping traffic through the Channel would have to be stopped...

- Businessman: ...or diverted to sail to the North Sea round the north of Scotland and Ireland. Brilliant! brilliant! Small fishing harbours will become great ports, a new Rotterdam or a new New York in Donegal...

- Musician: And with the North Pole melting away we'll have cruising ships going to Japan stopping over in Galway!(plays 2 or 3 chords on his violin or some trills on his flute)

Some loud car hooting and police sirens are heard outside. Everyone rushes to the door to see what it is. The Musician and the Businessman do too. Someone says it is the officials coming to plant the first stone for the bridge to France. They all go out pushing one another. The bar is empty and very quiet. A troll comes in throught the same window as before, opens a larger window to let the Young man come through too.
They go and sit at the table where the Businessman and the Young man were before, pushing the map aside.

- Troll: Do you believe in trolls?

- Young man (smiling softly): Do I believe in trolls?! Yes, of course I do, you are here talking to me.

- Troll: But I am only in your imagination. You can't prove I exist, you can't catch me!

Young man pretends to catch the troll and the troll pretends to escape.

- Young man: Now tell me in earnest, do You believe in mermaids?

The Troll is laughing to giggles for a while.

- Young man: What's so funny?

- Troll: You (pointing to Young man) are asking Me (pointing to himself) if I believe in mermaids!!! (dead serious) No, I don't.

- Young man: Why not?

- Troll: Because they are in your imagination. You can't catch one. Now tell me, do you believe in God?

- Young man: Ah! that is different!

- Troll: Different? You can't catch Him. He might be in your imagination.

- Young man: No, Troll, He is not in my imagination because there are effects of His presence. Just like the wind. You can't see it but you can see its effects.

- Troll: Effects of God? Like what?

- Young man: The world, the universe, us here talking... (gestures in large movement)
If God did not exist I would not be here alive thinking and talking to you of the existence of God.

- Troll: We could be talking of trolls, mermaids, unicorns, dragons or santa claus. Why is God different?

- Young man: I guess because God is about our sprirituality (looking lost), the way we can transcend our material selves... Dragons, unicorns and mermaids are about our capacity to dream and invent other worlds.

- Troll: Mmm... fiction and spirituality are... (gets cut off)

- Young man (suddenly): I'd better go now. Bye Troll!

The Troll runs to the window where he came in and leaves the same way without saying goodbye. The Young man leaves by the door.

                 
                CURTAIN DOWN

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